Experiment: how sound is made Cover

Experiment: how sound is made

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Questioning in science

This unit has been structured to provide opportunities for children to develop their questioning skills in science. The activity stems from the question starter, “What would happen to the sound we're making if we cut small holes along the length of the straw?” The first page is for the students to work through. It lists the materials required and the procedure, with illustrations included to provide visual clarification. The second page sets out the learning intention and success criteria, explains the science behind the activity and provides a set of questions to prompt thinking.

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Ages: 8-11 | Pages: 2
Code: E5989-13F

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Picture of Chris Astall

Chris Astall

After gaining a PhD in marine biology in 1992, Dr Chris Astall trained to become a primary school teacher and taught in schools in both the United Kingdom and New Zealand. Since 2008 he has been a senior lecturer in science education at the University of Canterbury, in Christchurch, New Zealand, a role that involves working with many schools throughout the country. In 1999 he was awarded the prestigious Royal Society (UK) Millennium Fellowship for his community science development project “Saturday Science and Technology”. His current research interests include the use of ICT in science education, the development of nature of science through children’s literature and exploring how schools can develop sustainable science practices. He has presented nationally and internationally and has facilitated numerous workshops, through science conferences and consultation work.
Picture of Warren Bruce

Warren Bruce

Warren Bruce been a science adviser to primary schools for the past 16 years. He has had material published in a series produced by the New Zealand Ministry of Education to support the curriculum. He has also been a member of the Ministry’s writing group for the Science Exemplars, which contain annotated samples of work from children up to 13 years of age. With the lifelong aim of arousing children’s curiosity in the world around them, he has developed units that integrate literacy and science through popular children’s fiction. He has also presented workshops at the annual Conference of the Australian Science Teachers Association, as well as in New Zealand, Bangkok and the United States.